Co-Directors’ Biographies

Christopher Allen, Co-Director of the CSU Flow Cytometry and Cell Sorting Facility, Assistant Professor in the Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences in the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, January 22, 2016.

Dr. Christopher Allen came to CSU in 2010 with over 10 years background in flow cytometry research. He began doing flow cytometry research as a graduate student (1997-2003) and continued to pursue flow cytometry-based methods of investigation during his NRSA post-doctoral fellowship (2003-2006). After his post-doc, he was appointed as a Team Leader in a high throughput flow cytometry, chemical biology screening program at the University of New Mexico Center for Molecular Discovery (UNMCMD), led by Dr. Larry A. Sklar, as part of the NIH Roadmap Initiative. Dr. Allen developed and implemented several large scale, chemical probe identification screens during his 3 year tenure at the UNMCMD. Using yeast as a discovery tool, his team screened in excess of 4 million wells using high throughput flow cytometric methods (appendix 3, 1-5) His research at CSU focuses on DNA repair in the context of cancer biology where he continues to develop flow cytometry assays to assess DNA damage, cell cycle status, nucleotide incorporation rates during replication and characterize apoptotic phenotypes associated with DNA damaging agents. His previous association with a strong flow cytometry core lab gave him years of hands on experience with multiple flow cytometry platforms. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences Department where he conducts an active research program in cancer biology.

 

Marcela Henao Tamayo, C0-Director of the CSU Flow Cytometry Facility, Assistant Professor in the Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Pathology in the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, January 22, 2016.

 

Dr. Marcela Henao-Tamayo started her flow cytometry research in clinical settings during medical school in Colombia. In 2003 she came to CSU, initially as a graduate student, where she continued studying M. tuberculosis host-pathogen interactions using animal models. Over the last 12 years, she has developed numerous flow cytometry protocols to perform studies on both mice and guineas pigs infected with virulent clinical strains of TB under highly restrictive BSL-3 conditions. She attended formal training courses where she received operator and analysis certifications for several instruments: DakoCytomation MOFlO, 2004; BD LSRII, 2006; BD FACSAria III cell sorting, 2012. She is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Pathology and oversees all the hazardous/high-risk experiments performed inside the BSL-3 facility with the BD LSR-II and FACSAria III cytometers/sorters. Additionally, Marcela conducts an active research program in immuno-pathology of tuberculosis.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *